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Terms and nomenclature to describe exercise


Professor Edward Winter ©2013
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Terms and Nomenclature to describe exercise.

Professor Edward Winter, BEd MSc PhD DSc FBASES FafPE

 

 

This webinar addressed correct and incorrect use of terms and nomenclature to describe exercise.  Correct use of terms should conform to classical (Newtonian) mechanics, the Système International d’Unités and hence, science. Frequently, such conformity does not occur.

 

At the end of the webinar, viewers were able to:

1.  Describe Swammerdam’s experiment;

2.  Define exercise/physical activity;

3.  Describe Newton’s 1687 Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica;

4. Recognise misuse of "weight",  "velocity", "work", "workload", "work rate", "power" and "efficiency";

5.  State reasons for using the term "intensity" to describe performed exercise;

6.  Describe domains of intensity to categorise physiological responses to exercise;

7.  Identify poor practice;

8.  Be a better scientist.

 

 

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Professor Winter was a founder member of BASES, co-designer of the Association’s accreditation scheme and until recently, was accredited both for research and scientific support in physiology.  He has authored more than 200 publications, been involved in the review of more than 2000 manuscripts and abstracts for all of the major journals in sport and exercise, has extensive experience of supervising and examining DSc, PhD, MPhil and MSc-by-research candidates and still plays county-standard squash.  He is resolute in his determination to ensure that sport and exercise science  upholds the principles and practices of science.